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Lists, Unlikely mum makes

Father’s Day Gifts for Lockdown

Last year for Father’s Day I was looking for things my toddler (not quite 2 at the time) could help make, or be a part of. It turns out that some of those Homemade Father’s Day Gifts for Kids actually go quite well in lockdown. So for anyone struggling for a gift idea this year, whether it’s because you can’t get the gift or experience you would like to give, or you (or your kids) can’t see your father or grandad due to lockdown, I’ve come up with a few ideas that you should be able to recreate.

fathers-day-breakfast-in-bedBreakfast in bed
It’s a simple classic that might be more welcome than usual under the current circumstances. If your kids are old enough, they can obviously do the making, while I’ve found that younger children like our 2 year old are very good at carrying plates and helping deliver the breakfast. No matter what the breakfast preference is, hot or cold, vegan or full-English, this allows you to practise kitchen skills with your little one while giving dad a long lie and some time to himself – a rarity in quarantine!

Movie night hamper
So you cant go to the cinema or for a day out for fathers day but that doesn’t mean you cant bring the cinema to you. Why not fill a hamper (or decorate and fill a cardboard box) with great movie night treats. Some recent movies have already been released on DVD so you could include those, or a family/dad favourite. Top up with popcorn, snacks and drinks and all that’s left to do is turn out the lights for an at-home cinema experience.

fathers-day-painted-stonesGardeners gift – painted stones
If the dad or grandfather in question is a bit of a green fingers and takes pride in his garden, then some painted stones are a nice personal touch. All you need to do is collect some large stones from the nearest park or beach (don’t travel too far just for stones!) and let your kids paint them how they fancy, whether its a rainbow, spots or maybe a frog or something else befitting for their garden. For an extra special touch, why not match the theme of the garden for an ideal fathers day garden gift? They can be used as ornaments, plant markers or even a doorstop for the shed.

The gift of chores
What better fathers day gift to give than the gift of chores? Your little ones can help out around the house, doing daddy’s usual chores if feasible – a 2 year old may not be able to operate a lawnmower but they can help with the dishes! Why not make the gift last longer with the promise of doing the chorea for a whole week? If you’re thinking of a grandad, there’s a promise to help when you are able to see them again, or there’s the prospect of doing some gardening or car washing if able to maintain social distancing!

fathers-day-ticket-giftSports fan gift – ticket to a match
If your dad or grandad is football mad, or can’t get enough of the rugby, why not give them a coupon which promises to buy a ticket to a live match when live sports (and spectators!) are allowed again. An alternative is always to give sports merchandise in lieu of a game – nobody can ever have too many mugs, especially of their favourite team/player, in my opinion!

The gift of solace
This one is quite important in lockdown, as peace and quiet can be hard to come by when family is always around. Mums are given a lot of encouragement to practice self-care and to carve out ‘me-time’ but it’s just as important for dads. Why not give the gift of solace and ensure the kids (and mum and anyone else!) are out of the house for a couple of hours, giving dad a little bit of time to himself. Whether he chooses to have a nap, a bath, play PlayStation, or finally get round to that thing he was meaning to do, the choice is entirely his. There’s a lot to be said for some quiet time to gather your thoughts and having space to enjoy things to yourself.

Postable gifts

If your child won’t be able to see their dad on Father’s Day for whatever reason, but still want to make sure their father receives a gift then why not create something that will fit in the letterbox, and let the postman brighten their day? This is especially applicable to grandads whom most kids probably don’t live with or won’t have seen for weeks already.

Handmade cards
It’s cheap and cheerful but it contains all the love and thought and effort (and mess!) from your child. Your only limitation here is the contents of your craft drawer. Whether it’s a beautifully hand-drawn card, stencilled, coloured with crayon, paint or felt-tip, additions of glitter, pipe-cleaners or cotton wool, the handmade touch is sure to bring a smile to your dad or grandad.

Photo frame
If you’re like me and still keep an old-school collection of printed photographs around then why not create a lovely photo frame with your favourite picture of you and your dad or grandfather? Or why not let your child choose their favourite photo, or a cute group photo of your kids to send to their fathers or papas? The photo frame part is simple – either use a spare one you have in the house (Ikea multipacks sometimes come in handy!) or get creative with your kids and a cardboard box. We’ve all got so much more cardboard now the recycling hasn’t been collected in weeks, we might as well make use of it!

Tokens and coupons
I touched on this last year in my homemade father’s day gifts post, but it’s an easy and post-friendly option. If grandad loves sport, get him a coupon to watch a match at a later date. For a bonus create a whole book of coupons to be redeemed post-lockdown. Some great ideas include tokens for different chores, favourite meals or snacks, tokens for trips and adventures, “ask gran/ask mum” tokens and so on.